Monday, 25 June 2018

Moths rock at Llanymynech

Bee Orchid (CB)
The June event was timed to take place on (national) Moth Night 2018 (which counterintuitively takes place over 3 days). The target group this year was pyralids. The moth group assembled before dark to put out an array of 13 traps along this botanical paradise.

As the wildflowers were putting on a good display, some of the group took the opportunity to botanise before the light faded. We were well rewarded with five species of orchid found: Common Spotted, Pyramidal, Bee, Greater Butterfly and a single Twayblade.

Although dry and still, (the wind having dropped after the recent storms), the temperature was a disappointing 12 C. However, activity at the moth table quickly heated things up. Fitting with the Moth Night theme, the first moth brought to the table was Homoesoma sinuella. This limestone grassland specialist proved a common pyralid at the site. Another 11 species of pyralid contributed to the total of 50 micro moths found. The more unusal species included Rhyacionia pinivorana, Metzneria lappella and a larval case of Coleophora limosipennella which protruded from a Wych Elm leaf.

Coleophora limosipennella (DBo)

Just as it got dark, Sue arrived with a tin of her delicious shortbread. Her bag would have been a lot lighter on the way down the hill as not a crumb remained.

A Lime Hawk-moth was a star attraction, obligingly perching on Lottie’s finger for photographs; and a fresh Lilac Beauty was much admired by all. A number of specialist moths of the site were brought to the table including Pretty Chalk Carpet, Heart & Club, and Haworth’s Pug. Other noteworthy moths included Satin Wave, Galium Carpet, and right at the end of the night, a surprising Bilberry Pug. The Montgomeryshire flora indicates that bilberry (a plant usually associated with acidic soils) has been recorded nearby, so perhaps it had just wandered a little from its main base. There were 72 macro moths recorded over the evening so the total list was 124 species – not bad for a cool night.

Lime Hawk-moth (GBC)
The event was well supported with 21 attendees, including a family of four who were out for a walk, but were quickly persuaded to join in with the fun. The children proved adept at catching moths – one even catching a moth in a pot as it flew by. It was great to see their enthusiasm and we all hoped that they may have caught the mothing bug!

As we were putting away the traps, long after midnight, a dog walker came to inform us that he had seen something glowing green on the top of the hill – the photographs were clearly of a Glow Worm – another great record from a site which always has a surprise in store!

Clare B.

The full species list is available here. Link to additional photos: (by GO, GBC, DBo & CB)
MMG event - Llanymynech Rocks - 16/06/18

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